1-Day Tashkent Itinerary And Travel Guide With Budget All-In

1-Day Tashkent Itinerary And Travel Guide With Budget All-In

By DAN FORTEZA

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Despite stories that there is nothing to see in Tashkent, I still wanted to give it a chance. And I’m glad I did. By utilizing Uzbekistan’s 5-day visa-free transit, I managed to enter Uzbekistan last November 2019 through Tashkent airport. With only one day to spend in Tashkent before I head south of the country, I was able to see what Tashkent is made of. The city has a mixture of modern new office buildings, hotels, parks, and crumbling Soviet-style apartment blocks. Moreover, it is a very Soviet city that has little remaining from its ancient Central Asian past.

But there is more to these! If you’re curious enough to know what main attractions this city has to offer, here I’ve compiled the perfect 1-day Tashkent tour itinerary with travel guide and budget included.

Hi there! First of all, I am Daniel – a solo backpacker from the Philippines. If you don’t know my story yet, feel free to read this article where I talked about how I quit my job in order to travel. This article was also featured on TripZilla Philippines.

Amir Timur Square
Amir Timur Square | Dantravels.org

Tashkent might be the capital of Uzbekistan, but it receives little attention from travelers. It’s a city that tourists come through, and often skip all the places to visit in Tashkent for the Great Silk Road attractions in Samarkand or Bukhara. I actually did the same thing (haha!) but at least I spent one whole day in Tashkent.

Read also my Samarkand budget itinerary with travel guide.

DO YOU NEED A VISA FOR UZBEKISTAN?

First things first–do you need a visa to enter Uzbekistan? Well, depending on your nationality, you may or may not need a visa. See the information below which category you fall in. Other countries not listed below require an Uzbek visa in advance.

Citizens of the following 65 countries can visit Uzbekistan without a visa:

I. 90 days

Armenia
Azerbaijan
Belarus
Georgia
Kazakhstan
Moldova
Russia
Ukraine

II. 60 days

Kyrgyzstan

III. 30 days

All European Union citizens
Andorra
Argentina
Australia
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Brazil
Brunei
Canada
Chile
Iceland
Indonesia
Israel
Japan
Liechtenstein
Malaysia
Monaco
Mongolia
Montenegro
New Zealand
Norway
San Marino
Serbia
Singapore
South Korea
Switzerland
Tajikistan
Turkey
United Arab Emirates
Vatican

Uzbekistan introduced the system of electronic visas for a period of up to 30 days from 15 July 2018. A single or multiple entry visa is valid for 30 days. The cost of obtaining an electronic visa for 20 USD. Travelers have to apply for the e-Visa for Uzbekistan at least three days in advance before their trip.

As of 21 March 2019 eVisa is available to the citizens of the following 77 jurisdictions:

Albania
Algeria
Angola
Antigua and Barbuda
Bahamas
Bahrain
Bangladesh
Barbados
Belize
Bhutan
Bolivia
Cabo Verde
Cambodia
Cameroon
China
Colombia
Costa Rica
Côte d’Ivoire
Cuba
Dominica
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
Egypt
El Salvador
Fiji
Gabon
Ghana
Grenada
Guatemala
Guyana
Honduras
Hong Kong
India
Iran
Jamaica
Jordan
Kiribati
Kuwait
Laos
Lebanon
Maldives
Marshall Islands
Mauritius
Mexico
Micronesia
Morocco
Nauru
Nepal
Nicaragua
North Korea
North Macedonia
Oman
Palau
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Philippines
Qatar
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Samoa
Saudi Arabia
Senegal
Seychelles
Solomon Islands
South Africa
Sri Lanka
Suriname
Thailand
Tonga
Trinidad and Tobago
Tunisia
United States
Uruguay
Vanuatu
Venezuela
Vietnam

IMPORTANT NOTE: Citizens of the following countries and territories do not require a visa for a 5-day stay if they are transiting through the international airports of Uzbekistan. According to the IATA Timatic, the outbound flight from Uzbekistan must be on Uzbekistan Airways.

Albania
Algeria
Antigua and Barbuda
Bahamas
Bahrain
Barbados
Belize
Bhutan
China
Colombia
Costa Rica
Dominica
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
Equatorial Guinea
Fiji
Gabon
Grenada
Guatemala
Guyana
Honduras
India
Jamaica
Kuwait
Lebanon
Maldives
Mauritius
Mexico
Morocco
Nauru
North Macedonia
Oman
Palau
Panama
Peru
Philippines
Qatar
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Saudi Arabia
Seychelles
South Africa
Sri Lanka
Suriname
Thailand
Trinidad and Tobago
Tunisia
Turkmenistan
United States
Uruguay
Vietnam
Venezuela

As a Philippine passport holder, I am both eligible of eVisa and Transit visa. And you might wonder why I chose to go with the 5-day visa-free transit. To be honest, I was actually fed up of processing too much visa lately. You see I’ve been traveling into different Asian countries in the past 3 months with my 3rd-world-country passport and it sucks to have one. Besides, I actually don’t mind staying for a short period of time. The important thing is–I got my Uzbekistan passport stamp! Woo hoo…

Uzbekistan passport stamp transit visa
Uzbekistan passport stamp transit visa | Dantravels.org

WHERE IS TASHKENT?

Tashkent is the capital city of Uzbekistan–the third country in Central Asia I have visited. It is located in the north-east of the country close to the Kazakhstan border. In fact, it is just 13 km away from the nearest Kazakh border crossing. By plane, it is a little more than 3 hours of flight from Dubai or almost 4 hours from Moscow.

Language: Uzbek (and some Russian)
Currency: Uzbekistani Soʻm (UZS)
Airport: TAS (Tashkent)
Preferred mode of transportation: Metro train
Time Zone: GMT +5

FLIGHTS TO TASHKENT:

Finding a cheap flight ticket to Tashkent from Europe and Central Asia is relatively easy. I booked mine coming from Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan via Uzbekistan Airways. It is advisable to fly in and out of Uzbekistan with Uzbekistan Airways if you’re entering via transit visa like myself.
I suggest you check Kayak (click HERE) as they usually offer cheap fare rates compared to other booking sites.

HOW I GOT TO THE CITY:

I arrived at Islam Karimov Tashkent International Airport (TAS)  at around 7:30 PM from an hour flight from Bishkek-Manas Airport (FRU).

My Couchsurfer host, Noor, was actually waiting for me right outside the arrival gate. It was so nice of him in making an effort to pick me up at the airport and accompanied me to his home. We even shared some Kebab meal on our way. It was all his treat!

A couchsurfer from Tashkent
Noor and I having Kebab | Dantravels.org

I was glad to connect with him through Couchsurfing just in the nick of time. Otherwise, I could have spent more money staying in hostels.

NOTE: There are several public marshrutkas (minibusses) at the airport. Just ask which one is going to your hotel. If you have the budget, feel free to ride a taxi. Taxis in Tashkent are cheaper in terms of European standards (but still I try to avoid taxis as much as I can.)

WHERE DID I STAY?

  • A Coucsurfer host and it’s FREE!

But in case you intend to stay in a hotel, you can book a room through Agoda or Booking.com. I usually book my room accommodations through booking.com. Room accommodation ranges from cheap hostels to luxury hotels. Book hostels through booking.com as they have free cancellation or pay-at-the-hotel option.

Use my link to book your hostel and you’ll get 10% of your booking back after your stay. Click this link to get that discount.

If Tashkent hotel isn’t to your liking, try AirBnb. Airbnbs are immersed in neighborhoods, condos, and townhomes. There is a feeling you get when you stay in an Airbnb that makes you feel like you belong in that city or town. Since it is someone’s home, there is a certain amount of pride you feel while staying there. I have used Airbnb on some of my other trips and I loved it!

If you’re new to AirBnB, then you can get up to 42 USD free travel credit by signing up via this link.

HOW TO GET AROUND TASHKENT?

    • By Metro. Tashkent’s metro is the easiest way to get around, running between 5:00 AM and midnight. There are 3 color-coded metro lines. You’ll need to buy a zheton (token) for each trip which cost 1,400 UZS (0.15 USD)
    • By Bus and Marshrutka (Minibus). Numbered buses and minibusses run a fair network of routes in Tashkent. The fare costs 1,400 UZS KGS (0.15 USD).
    • By Foot. Get your feet ready as you will walk to many places in Tashkent, too. And as I mentioned in my budget travel tips blog – “walk as much as you can!
    • By Taxi. Taxis are excellent but as always–a bit expensive. Totally not recommended for short-term and budget travelers.

TASHKENT 1 DAY TOUR (MY TASHKENT ITINERARY)

1st Stop: Memorial Park And Museum of Victims of Repressions.

First off on my Tashkent itinerary is visiting this memorial park in Tashkent. It’s clean, beautiful, totally serene and peaceful. It’s a place one can just go and sit alone for hours onwards. It is unbelievable that such a serene & peaceful place can have such a gory history behind it. The Tashkent TV tower (my 2nd stop) is in full view from the park. I would highly recommend to take some time out to sit beside the flowing water of the canal to seep in the serenity of the place. 

Memorial Park And Museum of Victims of Repressions.
Memorial Park And Museum of Victims of Repressions | Dantravels.org

The locals also seemed to be enjoying the place and were so friendly. I met this group of young Uzbek students with their teacher while having an excursion within the area. When I told them I was a tourist and do not speak Uzbek nor Russian, they tried their best to talk to me in English and they were also so excited to have a photo with me.

    • Duration (getting there + visiting): 1-2 hours
    • How I got here: By Marshrutka from hostel (don’t be afraid to ask a local for directions!)

2nd Stop: Tashkent TV Tower

The Tashkent TV tower was the first thing I’ve noticed in the city while we were on our way to my host’s place (after arriving from the airport). The lights are spectacularly pretty and bring the city to life during the night. And the next morning I was able to see it up close. So happy to see this iconic landmark of Tashkent!

Tashkent TV Tower
Tashkent TV Tower | Dantravels.org
    • Duration (getting there + visiting): 1 hour
    • How I got here: By foot from the Memorial Park

3rd Stop: Amir Timur Square

Amir Timur Square is located in the city center where you can see the statue of Amir Timur himself riding a horse with the view of Hotel Uzbekistan in the background. It’s impossible to be in Tashkent and not come across the central square of Amir Timur. It is a place with a lot of locals and tourists pouring in and taking a lot of photos. It also surrounded by a big forested park.

Amir Timur Square
Amir Timur Square | Dantravels.org
    • Duration (getting there + visiting): 1-2 hours
    • How I got here: By Metro (Bodomzor station to Amir Temur Hiyoboni station)

4th Stop: Amir Timur Museum

I didn’t go inside the museum–but, purely from the outside, it’s worth a look. Right next to Amir Timur square, it takes no time at all just to pop by and it’s certainly worth taking a look. The building itself is unlike those that you would find in the western countries and is a great introduction to being in Uzbekistan. A local told me that there are paintings and exhibits inside which explain why Timur is seen as a national hero.

You can book tickets HERE online in advance.

Amir Timur Museum
Amir Timur Museum | Dantravels.org
    • Duration (getting there + visiting): 1-3 hours
    • How I got here: By foot from Amir Timur Square

5th Stop: Broadway Alley

This pedestrian street is close to Amir Timur Square. You can relax and enjoy some good music or take a bicycle and just roam around the area. There also amusement activities and artists selling painting with smiling locals make it a must-visit!

Broadway Alley Tashkent
Broadway Alley | Dantravels.org
    • Duration (getting there + visiting): 1 hour
    • How I got here: By foot from Amir Timur Museum

6th Stop: State Museum of History of Uzbekistan

This museum was worth visiting to get an overview of the history of Uzbekistan. The first floor exhibits are from prehistory–lots of stone tools and pottery from thousands of years ago. There are also exhibits that cover the history of the Persian period, the Greek Macedonian period, the Arab invasions, followed by much glorifying of the Amir Temur (Tamerlane) empire, and followed by the Russian period. The entrance fee costs 16,000 UZS and is good for 2 hours but you can also book your ticket online HERE.

State Museum of History of Uzbekistan
State Museum of History of Uzbekistan | Dantravels.org
    • Duration (getting there + visiting): 1-2 hours
    • How I got here: By foot from Broadway Alley

7th Stop: Navoi Opera Theater

Commonly known as the “Opera”, the Alisher Navoi Theater is a beautiful building in the city center. The theater recognizes Alisher Navoi, who lived 600 years earlier and recognized as the founder of Turkik literature. Worth a view of this interesting architecture if not a show.

Navoi Opera Theater Tashkent
Navoi Opera Theater | Dantravels.org
    • Duration (getting there + visiting):  hour
    • How I got here: By foot the State History Museum.

8th Stop: Chorsu Bazaar

Chorsu Bazaar feels incredibly authentic and is much bigger than just a central dome. Truthfully, I didn’t find any of the things on offer particularly appealing for tourist, but the whole draw of Chorsu Bazaar for me are the parts that aren’t geared up for tourism–the food market, the inside of the dome where all of the butchers and fruit sellers are located, the ability to simply walk around and feel that you’re part of a bustling and busy Uzbek bazaar. It is definitely worth a visit and is next door to the Kukeldash Madrasah, which can be accessed from the market.

    • Duration (getting there + visiting): 1-2 hours
    • How I got here: By Metro (Kosmonavtlar station to Chorsu station)

9th Stop: Kukeldash Madrasah

Kukeldash Madrasah is situated just walking distance from Chorsu bazaar and was built in 1570 by the Shaybanid Dynasty of rulers. This Madrasah has a serene aura about it, but if you are planning on visiting Bukhara, Khiva or Samarkand then it is not that interesting as you will see more grand and original madrasahs.

PS: I just got a view of the Madrasah from its exterior as being a Non- Muslim entry would be refused. Thus, entrance fee is required.

Kukeldash Madrasah
Kukeldash Madrasah | Dantravels.org
    • Duration (getting there + visiting): 1 hour
    • How I got here: By foot from Chorsu Bazaar

10th Stop: Minor Mosque

Also known as the white mosque, The Minor mosque is an interesting and striking white building with its impressive white marble and large manicured gardens and fountain. The great architecture blew me away. Simply a must-see in Tashkent.

Minor Mosque Tashkent
Minor Mosque | Dantravels.org
    • Duration (getting there + visiting): 1-2 hours
    • How I got here: By Metro (Chorsu station to Bodomzor station)

MY 1-DAY EXPENSES IN TASHKENT

Day 0 (Arrival)

    • 114.85 USD (1,092,970.25 UZS) – Flight from Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan to Tashkent, Uzbekistan. I pre-booked it online at Kayak.
    •  0 UZS – My CS host paid for my minibus transport from the airport to his home.
    • NOTE: My host also treats me for dinner (that Kebab meal photo above).
    • Subtotal:  1,092,970.25 UZS (114.85 USD)
  • Day 1

    • 1,400 UZS – Fare, Minibus from host’s place to somewhere near Memorial Park
    • 1,400 UZS – Fare, Metro from Bodomzor to Amir Temur Hiyoboni
    • 1,000 UZS – Toilet fee
    • 16,000 UZS – State Museum of History ticket.
    • 1,400 UZS – Fare, metro from Kosmonavtlar station to Chorsu station
    • 4,000 UZS – Food (bread with meat)
    • 1,400 UZS – Fare, Metro from Chorsu to Bodomzor
    • 7,000 UZS – Food (some cake bread)
    • 1,400 UZS – Fare, bus from Bodomzor to CS host’s place
    • NOTE: My host also prepared an Uzbek dinner meal for me!
    • Subtotal: 35,000 UZS (3.68 USD)

  • Day 2 (Departure)

    • 1,400 UZS – Fare, bus from CS host to somewhere near Hyatt Hotel (to withdraw at ATM)
    • 1,400 UZS – Fare, metro from Mustaqillik Maydoni to Olmazor
    • 35, 000 UZS – Intercity bus from Tashkent bus terminal (near Olmazor) to Samarkand
    • NOTE: My host also prepared an Uzbek breakfast meal for me (as a farewell)
    • Subtotal: 37,800 UZS (3.97 USD)

Total Expenses: 122.5 USD (6,228.57 PHP)

What do you think of this 1-day TASHKENT itinerary?

I hope that you find this 1-DAY TOUR TASHKENT BUDGET ITINERARY and TRAVEL GUIDE blog useful!

If you have any questions, please feel free to ask in the comment section below.

RECOMMENDED PACKAGE TOURS

In case you’re also looking for package tours to simply jumpstart your actual itinerary, I highly recommend booking tours through Viator which is perfect for your Tashkent itinerary. See tours and packages I personally handpicked for you:

BOOKING ESSENTIALS

  • Hotel / Hostel
    • Booking.com. I usually book my hostel accommodation at booking.com. Thus, I recommend you guys trying it for your Tashkent itinerary.  Room accommodation ranges from cheap hostels to luxury hotels. Book hostels through booking.com as they have free cancellation or pay-at-the-hotel option.
    • Airbnb. Try Airbnb in finding comfy and cozy rooms for your Tashkent itinerary! I have used Airbnb on some of my other trips and I loved it!

Have you tried Airbnb? Sign up with my link and you will get up to 42 USD (2,200 Php) off your first stay. Click this link to get that discount.

  • Flights
    • KAYAK. All of my flight bookings are all from KAYAK. Kayak is one of the world’s leading travel search engines and searches hundreds of travel sites.

I suggest you check Kayak (click HERE) as they usually offer cheap fare rates compared to other booking sites.

  • Tashkent Package tours
    • Viator. Viator is the world’s leading resource for researching, finding and booking the best travel experiences worldwide.

Click here to find the best Viator deals in Tashkent!

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